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Where you should be drinking: Centrolina + Amaro Sour Cocktail Recipe

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Where you should be drinking: Centrolina + Amaro Sour Cocktail Recipe

Where you should be drinking: Centrolina We were headed from work to a show and needed a place for dinner that was on the way from the one to the other. We also wanted the food to be good. And, as always, the chance of a decent cocktail was a must. Oh, and a patio. It was a beautiful day. It took us a moment, but we finally realized that Centrolina in City Center was the place to go. We too often forget City Center. It’s a lovely spot: walkways strung with lights and accented with quiet fountains; stores way too rich for us to shop at but nice to look at; and good restaurants. It’s a completely different world from the noise and busyness of Chinatown and the Verizon Center that surround it. It’s so tucked away that it’s a little hard to remember it’s there. We’re glad we remembered this time. On the warm, quiet, pleasant patio, we shared a delicious three course Italian dinner. And they had us out just in time to make the show, right around the corner. What We Tried Amaro Sour: amaro, amaretto, lemon What We Thought We avoid amaretto sours, as any sane lover of good cocktails would. They’re generally too sweet; and they smack of artificial flavor. and of the panic of not knowing what to order and grasping for dear life to a familiar name. This one caught our eye, though, for a couple of reasons. First of all, we’ve been in a sour mood. Second, amaretto plays only a supporting role in this sour, giving the limelight to the much different amaro. We’re 90% sure that the bartender was inspired to this drink completely by the similarity of name between amaro and amaretto. Whatever, it tasted quite nice. The bitter of the amaro and the sweet of the amaretto mitigated one another nicely, leaving just pleasant hints of bitter and almond in a smoothly sour base. Amaro Sour Cocktail Recipe Ingredients 2 oz amaro–they used Zucca Rabarbaro 1 oz amaretto 3/4 oz lemon juice Luxardo cherry, for garnish Instructions Combine the amaro, amaretto, and lemon juice in a cocktail shaker. Add ice to above the level of the liquid. Shake for about 20 seconds. Pour, ice and all, into a rocks glass....

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Where You Should Be Drinking: Cork

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Where You Should Be Drinking: Cork

Where You Should Be Drinking: Cork We can tend to be something of homebodies on the weekends, sticking within walking distance of our Capitol Hill apartment. But we were feeling adventurous a couple of Sundays ago; so we wandered across town to 14th Street for brunch at Cork. They have a small, simple brunch menu of richly flavored small plates. We learned it’s best if you eat family style. They bring the dishes out as they’re ready, and if our meal was any indication they can be ready over a wide spread of time. So, the best way to eat at the same time is to share all the dishes. We highly recommend the cinnamon roll. What We Tried Sweet Brown: rye whiskey, Bevanda al Balsamico, grapefruit bitters The Marley Mojito: Armagnac, lime, mint, simple syrup What We Thought As the name indicates, Cork is a wine bar. In light of that, it was remarkable how they go above and beyond the usual mimosas and Marys in their cocktail menu. The drinks were light–as you’d hope brunch drinks to be–and simple, but with nice little creative twists. The Sweet Brown was a lightened version of a Manhattan, with an interesting balsamic vinegar playing the part of vermouth. Balsamico al Bevanda, ‘balsamic for drinking’ is exactly what it sounds like: a vinegar re-engineered to be a beverage. It still has a bit of the tang you’d expect from a vinegar, but with the sweetness and fruitiness turned way up, with influences of apple and cherry, and more grape than you think of a vinegar having. It made for a smooth but complex fruit flavor to the cocktail, the rye adding just a bit of peppery finish. The Marley Mojito is straightforward in concept: swap rum for brandy. It’s amazing, therefore, just how interesting it was to the taste. Fruity, but crisp. Smooth, but a little spicy. It made us want to go out right then and buy a bottle of...

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Where You Should Be Drinking: barmini

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Where You Should Be Drinking: barmini

Where You Should Be Drinking: DC’s barmini With new and interesting places opening up all the time, we can easily be caught up chasing what’s hot. In all the hustle, it’s easy to forget the places that have been there the whole time, doing what they do, and doing it extremely well. It would be a pity to forget barmini, renowned chef and restaurant mogul Jose Andres’ cocktail laboratory. We last (and first) visited barmini about a year ago, and were blown away by the experience. It’s like drinks and a show wrapped up in one: excellent and inventive cocktails, made with pizzazz, in a unique and stylish setting. With our friend Dan (who accompanied us on our first foray) in town, we decided it’s high time for another cocktail show. What We Tried Redemption: oloroso sherry, pedro ximenez sherry, mezcal, cinnamon, mint, grapefruit, spanish bitters Stolen Cask: amontillado sherry, dark rum, brandy, falernum, pineapple, clove smoke Med Martinez: Mediterranean gin, pedro ximenez sherry, maraschino, sherry vinegar, olive oil Thank You ‘Monchito’: vodka, walnut liqueur, oloroso sherry, pineapple, roasted coconut, verbena Mohan Travels to Peru and gets a Haircut: pisco, demerara rum, walnut liqueur, chicha morada, lime, ginger, vanilla, chuncho bitters Crossed Eyed Mary: aged rum, honey, lime, absinthe, passion fruit espuma What We Thought The Bartender One of our favorite things about our previous experience was conversation with the bartender. Barmini is a small place, with maybe only fifteen people in the bar at a time, and to our eyes three bartenders (with more barbacks and servers assisting). So, you’re sharing the bartender with one, or at most two, other parties. It’s very close to having your own personal bartender, all the more so since we sat at the bar both times and had a great view of the bartender making our drinks–and a few others. We loved watching our drinks come together, and enjoyed the unhurried pace and the close access that gave us the opportunity to observe what they were doing and ask all sorts of questions. Last time, this resulted in all sorts of interesting tips and tidbits, and a few little tastes and demonstrations. It’s like we were getting an education, as well as a show, as well as drinks. This time around, our bartender was perfectly skilled, and friendly, but a tad laconic. He answered our questions, but under a strict word limit. We were a bit deflated, but perhaps only because our experience last time had built up our expectations so high. Sherry We hadn’t noticed last time just how prominent a role sherry plays in barmini’s menu. We steered in that direction, choosing half of our drinks from the ‘Fortified Wine Cocktails’ section. But there are more fortified wines than sherry, and yet sherry made up about 60% of the fortified wine representation on the menu as a whole. It makes sense, given Jose Andres’ Spanish roots. And we’re not complaining. We’re sherry fans, and we’re constantly looking for ways to employ it well in cocktails. Barmini certainly did that. Plus, a sherry-heavy menu, with its lower alcohol content, gave us room to try more drinks. Novel Ingredients and Techniques Barmini is a great place to come across new ingredients and inventive techniques. This time around we were introduced to chicha morada, which...

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Liquor 101: Irish Whiskey + Glendalough Cocktail Pop-Up at Service Bar

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Liquor 101: Irish Whiskey + Glendalough Cocktail Pop-Up at Service Bar

Liquor 101: Irish Whiskey The Irish may have created whiskey. They also may not have. The Scots stridently argue that they’re the original whiskey distillers. Apparently, the vikings also have a claim, though modern Scandinavians don’t seem to stake that claim in quite the same way as the Irish and the Scots do. While we don’t know definitively who started it all, we do know that it was someone in the British isles, somewhere between a long time ago and a very, very long time ago–depending on your measurement of time and your definition of whiskey. In any case, the Irish have been on this whiskey thing for a while. Bushmills in Northern Ireland has held their license to distill since 1608; the license was granted by King James I, the same king who gave Shakespeare a patent to act. Despite its long and proud history, we haven’t heard much about Irish whiskey recently, except on St. Patrick’s Day, when rivers run green and bars flow with Jameson’s. From March 18th to March 16th, it seemed like only your old Irish uncle was still drinking Irish whiskey, while everyone else’s attention returned to single malt Scotches and American craft whiskeys. You could say that Irish whiskey has been out of step with current trends. While in the 18th and 19th centuries there were 100s of Irish distillers, by the early 2000s there were only three, each of them owned by even larger international liquor conglomerates. In other words, Irish whiskey had gone from being the Shakespeare of the whiskey world to being the Budweiser of the whiskey world, except without the high sales numbers. An unfortunate combination. All of that is in the midst of changing. In the past dozen years or so, a good number of new distillers and even craft distillers have opened up in Ireland, bringing new energy while simultaneously restoring traditional methods. And that renovation of Irish distilling is beginning to be appreciated here in the US, where Irish whiskey is currently the fastest growing segment of the spirits market–though admittedly from a small base. Check out Eric Asimov’s New York Times article to read more about this resurgence in Irish whiskey, and to get whiskey recommendations from a few of the country’s most respected spirits writers. I got my own education in new wave Irish whiskey recently, when I sat down for a couple of rounds of drinks with the brand ambassadors for two Irish craft whiskeys, Teeling and Glendalough. We met at  a Glendalough Cocktail Pop-Up at Service Bar (which we’ll definitely have to visit again!). I’d already gotten a taste of Glendalough at a tasting at Cordial in Union Market, and was very much looking forward to seeing what it was like in a cocktail. As I learned from my two new whiskey rep friends, the idea with Irish whiskey is that it’s the easygoing one. As one of them put it, it’s the whiskey you go for when you don’t want to have to fight through smoke to drink it. I’m not entirely sure, but I think that was a dig at Scotch. Glendalough Double Barrel is indeed a very easy whiskey to like. As I think is the case with most Irish whiskey, it was lighter in color and in body than the American and Scotch whiskeys with which I’m more familiar. To say...

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Where We’ve Been Drinking: Cherry Blossom Pop Up Pub in Shaw

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Where We’ve Been Drinking: Cherry Blossom Pop Up Pub in Shaw

Where We’ve Been Drinking: Cherry Blossom Pop Up Pub in Shaw It’s cherry blossom season right now in DC, the time of year when the 3000 trees gifted to Washington, D.C., by the Mayor of Tokyo in 1912 bloom. The Tidal Basin gets overrun by 10s of thousands of people, affecting traffic all around the Mall, for weeks on end. It might even be crazier than when the pope visited (and definitely crazier than this year’s inauguration ended up being–just compare the photos), but you can’t really be mad at the hordes of tourists, because they’re right: the overwhelming mass of stunning beauty is something to behold, like a picture of what it would be like if the world we’re taken over by flowers. At least that’s usually how it works. Like for the rest of DC, this winter’s been tough on the delicate blossoms. An unusually warm February kicked the trees into early blossom mode. But then an early March freeze pushed predictions of peak bloom back again, and an unexpected snowstorm has left us wondering just how many of the flowers will survive at all. If anything makes us believe that the blossoms will pull through, it’s all of the good cherry blossom energy emanating from Shaw. Next door neighbor, and sister, bars Mockingbird Hill and Southern Efficiency closed down their normal operations for the season and reincarnated as a Cherry Blossom Pop Up Pub. One of the bars is decorated as a full-on cherry blossom garden: artificial cherry blossoms festooned from the walls, the ceiling, and the shelves of the bar; strings of origami cranes serving as a divider between the front door and the bar; an impressionist-style mural of the Tidal Basin during peak bloom filling the entire back wall. The other bar, in what must be a more whimsical twist on the Japanese theme, is decorated entirely in Super Mario style. Both of them have a Japanese-influenced, cherry blossom inspired cocktail menu. What We Ordered As We Say in Brooklyn, Banzai: Armagnac, banana liqueur, sesame orgeat, lemon, black lemon bitters 1000 Paper Cranes: dark rum, Don Ciccio Cinque amaro, lime, cane sugar. What We Thought This was not the kind of theme bar where they dye everything pink, drop in a cherry, and call it a day. While there were light-hearted touches like Asian Cat tiki mugs, the drinks were thoughtfully designed. They catered to a variety of drinking tastes, with tiki and Collins contributions, whiskey cocktails and a punch or two. The two we ordered were spirit-heavy drinks, served straight up in coupe glasses, without a hint of cherry to them; but somehow they still seemed to fit the Japanese-cherry-flower theme. As We Say in Brooklyn at first seemed to have a chocolate foretaste. But it wasn’t chocolate; as you drank more, you realized it was a complex blend of Armagnac’s spice with banana and hints of sesame oil. That complexly sweet front gave way to a silky, lemon aftertaste, with just a hint of bitterness. Overall, the drink was sweet, but with a full, well-rounded flavor. 1000 Paper Cranes was a full-on burst of plum flavor, again with a touch of bitterness at the end. Both drinks were unusual and satisfying, like deep reflections on the taste of spring in cocktail form. If You Go Show up early. And...

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Where We Keep Drinking: Beuchert’s for Brunch

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Where We Keep Drinking: Beuchert’s for Brunch

Where We Keep Drinking: Beuchert’s for Brunch People often ask us what our favorite place for cocktails in DC is. While we have plenty of answers to give of great places to go for a drink, the truth is that we haven’t had much of a chance yet to develop a favorite. We came to DC about 18 months ago with a whole new city to explore, a city in the middle of a food and drink explosion, to boot. With new restaurants, bars, and distilleries opening all the time (and a whole back catalog of places having opened in the few years before we arrived), going someplace a second time is a luxury we can seldom afford. There’s always someplace we haven’t visited yet, waiting to be tried, enjoyed, and written about. In our preference for the as of yet untasted, we make an exception for Beuchert’s Saloon. Beuchert’s is the place we go when we want familiar and comfortable, when we just want to put ourselves into safe hands and be taken care of. A necessity for such a place is, of course, that it be within a short walk in our beloved Eastern Market neighborhood. Add to that the excellent, solid but creative bar, and a special knack for fresh, updated comfort food, and you have the perfect place to go after a long, hard day at work when there’s nothing in the fridge. For the first time, we stopped by good, old Beuchert’s for brunch last weekend. The food was just what we hoped for: rich, delicious, and simultaneously reliable and interesting. The smoked bluefish hash was decadently down home, and the otherwise standard eggs and bacon Beuchert Breakfast was made special by its lovely cheesy grits. Their brunch menu contains only the standard brunch option, but thankfully they offer their full cocktail menu at brunch, and it’s a menu diverse enough to contain plenty of brunch-friendly options. What We Ordered Meyer’s Briggs Flip: Cotton and Reed dry spiced rum, pisco, Meyer lemon, spiced grenadine, Don Ciccio Concerto What We Thought One of the things we enjoy about Beuchert’s is their use of local, craft liquor in recipes that are inspired by the classics but tweaked to highlight the liquors’ uniqueness. So, a drink containing both Don Ciccio’s espresso liqueur and Cotton and Reed’s spiced rum was an easy sell. Having enjoyed our straight sip of it so much on our visit to the distillery, we were especially eager to taste the rum in a cocktail. As it turns out, the M-B Flip, while a very pleasant, brunch-friendly drink, didn’t give us much insight into the local liquors. The excellent spiced grenadine and Meyer lemons played the starring roles in this cocktail, creating a nicely balanced sweet, tart, and spicy mix. The unadvertised egg white froth was a welcome addition; when we’re drinking at brunch, we almost always appreciate the light texture brought by egg white. We couldn’t really taste the coffee liqueur, though we could see its influence in the drink’s interesting purple-brown color. The rum provided a nice solid base to the drink. If you’ll remember, when we tasted the rum, we found it gin-like, while the bar manager described it as a whiskey substitute in cocktails. That’s exactly the role it played in...

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Where We’ve Been Drinking: Left Door on DC’s 14th Street

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Where We’ve Been Drinking: Left Door on DC’s 14th Street

Where We’ve Been Drinking: Left Door on DC’s 14th Street On the corner of 14th and S NW, on the second floor of what looks like it was not so long ago a townhouse, you’ll find Left Door. Except for the big bar in the middle of it, it feels like it’s still a townhouse parlor, with a casual, familiar feel and small clusters of well-worn, comfortable furniture like you might find in your great aunt’s front room. We stopped in just after opening at 5pm on a Thursday night, and though there were a few other parties already there before us, we easily found a place at the bar. It’s possible that it gets busier later in the evening, or maybe it’s always a relaxed and quiet place to get a drink. In our experience, at least, it had all the comfort of a neighborhood bar, but with drinks you might expect at one of the hot cocktail lounges. If we lived nearer to 14th, it’s easy to imagine we’d make this place a regular haunt. What We Tried Gu-Ba-Ga-Bi: fino sherry, Cocchi Americano, Suze, and Peychaud’s On a Date: rye whiskey, amontillado sherry, Royal Combier, calamus bitters, flamed lemon peel What’s Your Sign: rye whiskey, Brenne French single malt whiskey, Cynar, Carpano Antica sweet vermouth, aromatic bitters, Peychaud’s bitters, calamus bitters, Amargo-Vallet rinse Two Shakes of a Lamb’s Tail: mezcal, blackstrap rum, lime juice, old fashioned bitters, cane syrup, tonic What We Thought We’re always on the lookout for a good use for Suze, the bitter aperitif popular in southern France. Gu-Ba-Ga-Bi wasn’t quite that, with the sherry outshining the Suze to a surprising degree. It was, however, quite a pleasant drink, sort of a half-sherry version of a Half-Sinner/Half-Saint. It was smooth, and eminently drinkable. On a Date and What’s Your Sign are both Manhattan variants, and both interesting ones. The use of amontillado sherry instead of sweet vermouth gave On a Date a lighter body and a drier flavor, with the Royal Combier bringing a mysterious whiff of herbal bitterness. What’s Your Sign was a sort of a kitchen sink of a Manhattan, with two or three of everything a Manhattan might call for, plus a rinse. Throwing everything at the drink in this way worked surprisingly well, producing a rich, well-rounded, and unexpectedly well-integrated flavor. Two Shakes was a very satisfying, sophisticated take on a tiki drink. A little smoky, a little sour, deeply sweet, a little bitter. Somehow both dense and light at the same time. In a pretty decent round of drinks, this unassuming one took the prize. If you go The entrance can, of course, be a bit tricky to spot. Look for the hipster standing by a door, trying to go unnoticed and look slightly menacing at the same time. That’ll be your...

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Where You Should Be Drinking: Denson in DC’s Penn Quarter

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Where You Should Be Drinking: Denson in DC’s Penn Quarter

Where You Should Be Drinking: Denson in the Penn Quarter It seems like everyone has become aware the past couple of years that we’re at this moment of Peak Media. There is so much to read, there are so many movies to watch, and there is especially so much TV that no one can possibly keep up with everything. You have to pick your spots. For us, for most of the year, we cope by entirely ignoring movies. Summer blockbusters come and go without us noticing. We’re for the most part oblivious to the big franchises. The absolute perfect movie for us could be released in October and we wouldn’t even know, because we’re simply not paying attention. During awards season, though, we turn our movies on. As soon  as the buzzy speculation about Oscar nominations starts, usually a few weeks before the Golden Globes, we start keeping an eye on the showtimes. Our goal, which we’re sometimes better at and sometimes worse, is to watch all of the films nominated for more than one major award. I don’t know about you, but we’ve really enjoyed–maybe not quite the right word–this year’s Oscar movies. All of them have done such a good job of that thing a movie can do that a TV show really can’t, completely drawing us into a different world and a different story. A few of our quick notes from awards season: In a crop of very sad movies, Jackie actually struck as the saddest. (We know that Jackie didn’t end up meeting our criteria, with only one major award nomination. It was one of our earlier viewings, before the nomination consensus had solidified. We don’t regret it, though. It was captivating and thought-provoking). Mahershala Ali and Janelle Monae were great in Hidden Figures and amazing in Moonlight. Kudos to them for being in two of the year’s best movies. Also, though, maybe we could give some other black actors parts too? We’re team La La Land. We know there’s a huge backlash right now, and 20 years from now we might very well look back and think, ‘That won best picture?’ But we don’t care. Two very charming people took us on a wonderful ride, and we love them for it. The Oscars are coming up quickly now, but we still have a little bit of time before our movie-watching selves turn into pumpkins again. So, we met after work Friday night to catch a show–the above-mentioned Moonlight. We had a little bit of time between work and the showtime; so we dropped into Denson for a round of pre-movie drinks. It’s a rather small space, with the dark warm feeling of a neighborhood bar. It has something of a yesteryear feel about it, both in the decor and in their friendly but firm insistence that gentlemen remove their hats. We arrived in the middle of happy hour, and the place was perfectly full and lively. We had just a few minutes of awkward hovering and feeling like we were in everyone’s way before a small, comfortable corner with an oversized drink ledge opened up at the very moment our drinks arrived. Just what you want out of a Friday happy hour. What We Ordered A Rose is a Rose is a Rose: mezcal, gin, Lillet Rose, agave, lemon, sparkling...

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Where to Drink: Joselito at Eastern Market

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Where to Drink: Joselito at Eastern Market

Where to Drink: Joselito at Eastern Market You may have noticed that we enjoy traveling. We also like staying home, a lot. While we’ll happily fly to Paris or take the train to New York for a good cocktail, when we’re in DC, we don’t often want to leave our own lovely and lively neighborhood of Eastern Market. If we can’t walk there, there’s a good chance we won’t go. Lucky for us, there are plenty of great drinks within a short walk of our apartment, with new options appearing all the time. The newest addition to the neighborhood is a Spanish restaurant and bar called Joselito. An impromptu Tuesday–yes Tuesday– happy hour with our dear neighbor gave us the perfect opportunity to check it out. The bar service was a tad slow–perhaps they’re adjusting to their sudden popularity–but both the drinks and the food were worth the wait. Even better, during the charmingly named Hemingway Hour (4p-7p), both food and drinks (including cocktails, hurrah!) at the bar are 20% off. Hemingway, of course, spent a great deal of time in Spain, loved his food, loved his drink even more, and quite possibly loved bullfighting best of all–there’s a subtle bullfighting theme, with the name of the happy hour and at least some of the drinks making reference to it. What We Ordered Cien Sonatas: Bar Hill gin, rosemary infusion, pear juice, yuzu Ruisenor: Blackwell aged rum, peach shrub, angostura bitters, lime juice Red Sangria What We Thought The silky smooth sangria came served in an attractive little carafe from which you poured it into an old fashioned glass containing a single, large ice cube. Our favorite thing about the sangria was that ice cube. Rather than floating in the drink, the sangria’s fruit was frozen into the ice cube. It was easier to drink. It was pretty, And it made the drink just a little more fruity as it melted. The Cien Sonatas, with it’s subtle mix of fruit and herb, was what we had in mind when we ordered the failed Dirty and Delicious over Christmas. The Ruisenor built layers of bitter spiciness and enjoyable sourness on a strong base of rich sweetness. All three of our drinks were what you’d hope for from a high-quality happy–ahem, Hemingway–hour: light but not watered down, complex but easy drinking, and well-presented. It was a sophisticated, adult version of the happy hour. If You Go Let us know. We’re right around the corner, and we love walking to good drinks with friends....

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Where to Drink: Cotton & Reed Rum Distillers

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Where to Drink: Cotton & Reed Rum Distillers

Where to Drink: Cotton & Reed Rum Distillers Almost at the exact moment when we were crawling our way through Ivy City to visit all four of DC’s distilleries, three new ones–all outside of Ivy City, interestingly–were opening up. I guess we’ll have to get our next crawl in the books. In the meantime, we popped our heads into one of them last weekend. While the Ivy City distillers are all making gin and vodka while their whiskeys age, Cotton and Reed has gone in a different direction; they’re DC’s only rum maker. Cotton and Reed is the second rum distiller we’ve ever visited. The first was on our honeymoon. It just so happened that the small Caribbean island where we decompressed from our wedding festivities and let some warmth seep into our January-cold bones was the location of the oldest continuously operating still in the western hemisphere. The setting and the history were unbeatable. It was quite the experience to see rum made pretty much the same way it has been since colonial days, complete with a watermill powered cane press. The rum, however, left something to be desired. It turned out that particular distillery specialized in highly over-proofed (like, too strong to be imported to the US ) young rum–moonshine, basically. Cotton and Reed was pretty much the opposite experience. Located amidst the wholesaler warehouses next to Union Market, it was nowhere near as quaint. The rums, though, were delightful. We tasted the silver rum in the form of an excellent, clean-tasting daiquiri, sweet and tart in just the right proportions. We also ordered a shot of their other product, a spiced rum like none we’ve ever tasted before. It had faint notes of the baking spices familiar from any other spiced rum we’ve had, but they were mixed with more savory spices and other botanicals. It was like a rum made with a gin-maker’s sensibilities. We asked the bar manager, Lukas, what he mixed this unique spirit with, since it obviously can’t just be swapped into any other spiced rum recipe. He answered that he mostly thinks of it as an interesting substitute for whiskey, which we could see. He went on to say that, mostly though, he just drinks it neat, a bold claim for a young spirit, but one we fully believed since we were happily sipping on our shot glass of it as we talked. It’s worth mentioning that Cotton and Reed may still be trying to smooth out some rough edges in its operation. This was actually our second attempt to visit them. Our first came on New Year’s Day, when we met some friends for coffee at Union Market. We had a little time to kill after coffee and ran across a chalkboard sign in the market’s outdoor area advertising that DC’s only rum was a mere 100 steps away. We took our 100 steps, only to find that the distillery was closed that day–understandable, perhaps given the holiday, but also a bit deflating. On this visit too, we had a bit of a misunderstanding. When we arrived, we asked about their distillery tours and didn’t get much of an answer. Eventually we pieced together that the tours were conducted on the hour, cost $20, and included a cocktail and a...

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